Saturday, February 4, 2017

Let's Read: The Once and Future King (Ch.19)


Did you all enjoy the geese filled romp from the previous chapter? If you did, then good news! There is more of it! If you didn’t then, bad news… there is more of it.

Wart continues his mission of running with the wolves, in this case the wolves being geese, and is starting to warm up to Lyo-lyok, that goose who verbally spanked his ass when he prattled on about knightly violence.

He grew to be fond of Lyo-lyok, in spite of her being a girl” (171).

Puberty! *gasp*! Wart better get his old socks and anachronistically misplaced handkerchiefs ready!
But then talk move to discussing geese life.

She told him how every White front was an individual—not governed by laws or leaders, except when they came about spontaneously.”

Geese are anarcho-capitalists? Objectivist geese?

At the same time, no goose claimed any exclusive territorial right in any part of the world—except its nest, and that was private property.”

Geese are moderate libertarians?

After this, we get a scene which alternates with another scene: namely, Wart’s pseudo-romantic love interest explains to him about geese culture and the role of elders—the geese admiralty, distinguished by the black stripes on their breasts—and that of some older goose getting captured by a human; once the goose gets captured he enforces discipline on his birdy compatriots. It is an amusing moment.

Oh, yeah, Wart also learns some geese songs which, as far as I can tell, only exist to give White an excuse to fill up pages with more Tolkien-esque nonsense. I suppose if I was a historian of bard songs or whatnot, I would have a higher knowing on if these geese songs were inspired by some historical precedent. Since I am not such a historian, however, I will leave it at that.

Boethius's The Consolation of Philosophy (Notes:54)

Born into a wealthy Roman family in 480, though Boethius had lost his father at an early age, he was adopted by an even more prominent fami...